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Cheverus science prepares students to be innovative scientists and informed citizens. We are committed to a rigorous foundation in life and physical sciences in the context of our changing world. We recognize that in the recent decade alone, advances in applied and basic sciences have catapulted us into a world of greater opportunities and questions. Our hands-on, inquiry- and lab-based curriculum is grounded not only in rich content but is also guided by our Jesuit mission of service to humanity. We aim to grow leaders, thinkers, innovators, designers and engaged citizens.

Learn about the Cheverus STEM concentration which encourages students to expand academically, co-curricularly and personally while exploring and integrating science, technology, engineerng and mathematics.

Follow Cheverus science at #iggyscience.

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    Helene Adams

    Teacher Ms. Adams is a teacher leader in the Greater Portl ...
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    Victor DiSilvestro

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    Jennifer Lafrance

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    Cicy Po

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    Erika Rhile

    Teacher Ms. Rhile is a dedicated teacher and a working sci ...
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    Mark Smith

    Teacher Mr. Smith has a deep and abiding love for the Chev ...
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    Henri St. Pierre

    Teacher Mr. St. Pierre is a beloved science educator who c ...
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    Kenneth Swanberg

    Teacher Mr. Swanberg is a miner of useful analytical apps ...

Courses

Year — 1 credit
Grade 9

Global Science combines the foundations of biology, chemistry and physics. Students will develop an understanding of the enterprise of science as a whole—the wondering, investigating, questioning, data collecting, analyzing, problem solving, design and communication. Topics will include Earth Systems, Geochemical Cycles, Natural Resources, as well as interactions between the living and nonliving components in an ecosystem.   An emphasis on environmental science, policy and social justice helps students relate science to themselves, our community and, ultimately, the world.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 10

Students learn the current themes in biology, such as ecology, organization, cell theory, inheritance, diversity, form and function, and evolution. They participate in numerous labs and dissections, such as classifying organisms, examining behavior, comparing evolutionary characteristics, and testing their own nervous system. The course emphasizes a basic working knowledge of the human body, and promotes a critical analysis of current advances in medicine and science.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 10

Biology Honors is intended for those interested in pursuing science. The goals achieved by each student through participation in the Biology Honors experience are a heightened awareness and interest in biology, an appreciation of both the broad scope and the enormous depth that the field of biology encompasses. Students will learn the basic foundation in general biology, human physiology and anatomy, an interest in current scientific topics, including the advancements in genetic engineering and the ethical decisions created by such advances.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11

This introductory course presents many of the major concepts in the field of chemistry, the study of matter. It concentrates on the relationship between the structure of matter and its behavior; attempting to pose the question “why does something behave a certain way” and answer the question based on the structure and chemical changes that occur. The other primary emphasis of the course is on the process of learning problem-solving techniques and strategies, both mathematical and investigative. While providing an overview of specialized behaviors of the elements (making extensive use of the periodic table to indicate structure and draw conclusions about generalized property patterns), the course will also introduce solution chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory experiences will serve to illustrate the principles being studied as well as to introduce safe and proper scientific investigative procedures.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11

Chemistry Honors is designed for students who will pursue a career requiring further science education at the college level. Algebra and study skills are needed to be successful in this process-oriented course. It concentrates on the relationship between the structure of matter and its behavior; attempting to pose the question “why does something behave a certain way” and answer the question based on the structure and chemical changes that occur. The other primary emphasis of the course is on the process of learning problem-solving techniques and strategies, both mathematical and investigative. While providing an overview of specialized behaviors of the elements (making extensive use of the periodic table to indicate structure and draw conclusions about generalized property patterns), the course will also introduce solution chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory experiences will serve to illustrate the principles being studied as well as to introduce safe and proper scientific investigative procedures.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12

Conceptual Physics is designed for the student who wishes to take a physics course, but would rather study the conceptual side rather than the analytical side. The course describes everyday events in familiar English, with some equations to further understanding physics concepts. Ideal for the senior going onto business, marketing, journalism or any other non-science/math related field.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12
Prerequisite: Geometry or Algebra II (or concurrent)

The physics course is one that nurtures the student’s curiosity and skills in science while drawing on the aptitude and skills gained in previous science and math courses. Physics is also a laboratory-oriented course. It develops scientific processes such as laboratory techniques and scientific report writing --  “The Lab Report.” Physics is truly an indication of a student’s ability to succeed in the rigors of a physical science or engineering program in college.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

Physics Honors is an empirical science that studies the traditional Newtonian topics, such as Mechanics, States of Matter, Optics, and Electromagnetism. Students should be self-motivated to read college level text material daily and capable of a high level of critical thinking in their problem solving. This is a lab oriented class and students are expected to write up a formal lab report from gathered data. This course is strongly recommended for students who will be going into a math/science field in college, a must for engineering students, The level of math is what differentiates this course from College Preparatory Physics and Conceptual Physics.

Year -- 1 credit
Grade 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.  Although the Physics 1 course includes basic use of trigonometric functions, this understanding can be gained either in the concurrent math course or in the AP Physics 1 course itself.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12
Prerequisite: Biology

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a hands on laboratory course that investigates the forms, processes and systems of the human body. Students will study the basic organization of the body, the biochemical composition and interactions, the parts of the major body systems as well as how they work together.  Case studies of infectious and genetic diseases and current discoveries in medicine will enhance our study.  This College Prep class is designed for students who have an interest in pursuing a career in the health fields,and for students who want to learn more about their own bodies and how to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Semester — ½  credit
Grade 11-12
Prerequisite: Biology

This course is designed for students with special interest in Marine Biology.  Topics students will study include ecological concepts of the sandy beach, rocky shore and benthic communities, seaweeds, planktonic forms, plankton and their relationship to marine life cycles, nekton, benthos, marine bacteriology, marine biological resources, and marine pollution. Special attention will be given to Maine’s coastal environment and working waterfront.  This course has a significant laboratory component, and will be taught as a mix of lecture, lab and field experience.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12

The goal of AP Environmental Science is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The Science Department strongly recommends that all seniors who wish to take AP Environmental Science also take Physics and Statistics. The class meets five periods per week, and sometimes after school and on weekends. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12
Recommended:  Statistics

Advanced Placement Biology aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. AP Biology includes topics regularly covered in a college biology course. The AP Biology labs are equivalent of those performed by college students. The Science Department strongly recommends that all seniors who wish to take AP Biology also take Physics. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11-12
Prerequisite: Department Approval for Juniors

AP Chemistry is designed for students who will pursue a career requiring further science education at the college level. Algebra and study skills are needed to be successful in this process-oriented course. Its main focus is to prepare the student to successfully complete the AP Chemistry Examination. It concentrates on the relationship between the structure of matter and its behavior; attempting to pose the question “why does something behave a certain way” and answer the question based on the structure and chemical changes that occur. One of the primary emphases of the course is on the advanced process of learning problem-solving techniques and strategies, both mathematical and investigative. While providing an overview of specialized behaviors of the elements (making extensive use of the periodic table to indicate structure and draw conclusions about generalized property patterns), the course will explore in-depth, solution chemistry, types of reactions, thermochemistry, gas laws, reaction kinetics, and nuclear chemistry. The advanced laboratory experiences will serve to illustrate the principles being studied as well as to introduce safe and proper scientific investigative procedures. Students in this course are required to take the AP exam.

Semester — ½ credit
Grades 9-12

Using lightweight computer equipment, we will learn how to design everyday objects. The students will apply spatial geometry, principles of good measurement, creativity and artistry for numerous projects. If time and material allows, these projects will be printed. The interface will be OnShape, an educationally free CAD program that is usable across all devices. Prospective students should have at least two items that they would like to design that will improve some aspect of their lives.

Semester — ½ credit
Grades 9-12

Why is it needed? When will it happen?  Does you phone remind you when to leave for school, and does it take into account the current traffic and weather? Does your car drive itself? Are these examples of intelligence? We will start with a definition of intelligence, and gradually introduce exercises that challenge the students to solve problems using artificially intelligent resources (Google, Siri, Alexa). We will delve into the topics of probability, confidence, imprecision, and fuzzy logic as we learn the difference between intelligent and reflexive responses.

Graduation Requirements

 

25 ½ Credits Minimum
  • English -- 4 credits *
  • Math -- 4 credits *
  • Theology -- 4 credits *
  • Science -- 3 years 
    (Global Science, Biology, Chemistry)
  • Foreign Language -- 3 years (same language)
  • History -- 3 years
    (History I, II, III)
  • Fine & Performing Arts -- 1 credit total
  • Computer Technology -- ½ credit
  • Electives -- 3 credits

* 1 credit each year 9-12


Non-Credit Requirements
  • Retreat -- each year
  • Community Service
    -- each year (Community Service page)
  • College Advising
    (grades 11 & 12)
  • Formation Seminar (grade 9)

Academic Excellence in the Jesuit Tradition