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The Theology Department is committed to leading students on a journey that systematically examines divine revelation, specifically the Catholic Faith, Moral Theology, Scripture and Social Justice. Through such a study, it is our goal that the students will have a solid understanding of the subject matter so that their own faith may be deepened to a point where they are confidently and humbly putting that same faith into action for the betterment of others. It is our hope that the students placed in our care will have nurtured reflective habits that aid them in striving for excellence in all things.

Faculty

  • Profile Photo

    Daniel Haskell

    Teacher
  • Profile Photo

    Mary King

    Teacher
  • Profile Photo

    José Peralta

    Teacher

Courses

Year — 1 credit
Grade 9

This course is an introduction to the basics of Christianity.  Because of the varied backgrounds of Cheverus students, ranging from the unchurched to the religiously literate, Theology I attempts to lay a foundation both in Church teaching and in Scripture.  The course begins with a study of St. Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit Order.  Through this study students are introduced to basic principles of Ignatian spirituality – a core ingredient in their Cheverus education.  Next we examine the experiences of growth and questioning which are part of early adolescence.  We then begin to explore who is God and how he calls us to faith, individually and collectively.  In this context, students become acquainted with the Old and New Testaments.  Special attention is paid to God’s self-revelation, the developing Covenant, and humanity’s evolving understanding of God.  The life and teachings of Jesus lead to discussions about the spirit over the letter of the law and what it truly means to be “people for others.”  Jesus’ passion and resurrection is then seen as the Christian Passover – our rebirth to new life made possible by God’s love.  A final unit on the development of the Church helps students understand how Christianity became an independent religion and how the Catholic Church relates to other Christian churches.  Throughout the year lessons on Catholic doctrine, liturgy, sacraments, Holy Days, saints, structure, etc. are introduced when appropriate.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 10

Sophomore theology class begins with an examination of the mission of the Catholic Church - her constitution, self-understanding, models, the marks of the Church, diverse roles within the Church, ecumenism, and inter-religious dialogue.  The course then examines the Church’s sacramental vision of the world generally and the seven sacraments particularly.  The second semester takes up the study of ethics, moral decision making, and virtue. The nature of this course is both catechetical and theological. Students are responsible for understanding Church teaching, but they will also be challenged to engage in honest inquiry, raising difficult questions and searching for meaning and personal understanding. The questions raised in theology class will help students evaluate their own ideas about what constitutes a meaningful life, how God is active in their lives, and how to move more deeply and responsibly into their own unique gifts. Despite differences in religious backgrounds and levels of faith the course will help students develop skill in finding common ground as well as celebrating personal difference. Some central questions for the year:  How is religion shaped by society?  How is society changed by religion?  What does it mean to say that the Church is sacrament?

Year — 1 credit
Grade 11

This course begins with an introduction to the Bible through an examination of its development, literary forms, interpretations, and inspiration. The course then turns to Genesis and the beginnings of the world and humanity as understood by the ancient Hebrews. After this, the course traces the development of the Hebrew people from the time of Abram through the Hasmonian Era and King Herod, which places us on the threshold of the New Testament. In the New Testament, the course looks at the Gospels as they reveal the person of Jesus Christ who fulfills the Old Testament prophecies. The Acts of the Apostles, New Testament letters and Revelation are then examined. Through a critical examination of the texts, the students are encouraged to examine their own faith and beliefs in light of the class material and discussions.

Year — 1 credit
Grade 12

The fourth year of theology is dedicated to the study of social justice. The course begins with an examination of personal spirituality in order that the student may develop an authentic view of justice, one based in humility and a consequent understanding of responsibility. Albert Camus' The Fall is used as an examination of conscience. The Trinity, Pentecost and the Sacraments are then included as Catholic Christian responses to our own selfishness and the injustice we foster. Here some aspects of Ignatian spirituality that are implicit to the Cheverus education become a lens for viewing the application of these theological beliefs in daily life and toil. Students also read excerpts from Dorothy Day’s account of her conversion and path to service, so that they may see such a response lived in the modern world. The course then turns to a philosophical understanding of justice. To answer the question, "what is justice?” the class draws upon the works of Plato, Aristotle and Saint Thomas Aquinas. Plato's Republic offers the opportunity to again link personal justice with social justice. With Aristotle and Aquinas, the attention is firmly fixed on justice as the preeminent moral virtue. Finally, the course engages in concrete modern social justice issues. These include social-economic issues of poverty, hunger, the homeless, just wages, the dignity of work, business ethics, and the environment. Also covered are social issues revolving around the dignity and sanctity of life including racism, sexism, abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, pacifism, and the just war. The hope is that the students' understanding of grace, solidarity and cultivating virtues which strengthen our  concern for the common good can be applied to these very real concerns our society faces.

Graduation Requirements

 

25 ½ Credits Minimum
  • English -- 4 credits *
  • Math -- 4 credits *
  • Theology -- 4 credits *
  • Science -- 3 years 
    (Global Science, Biology, Chemistry)
  • Foreign Language -- 3 years (same language)
  • History -- 3 years
    (History I, II, III)
  • Fine & Performing Arts -- 1 credit total
  • Computer Technology -- ½ credit
  • Electives -- 3 credits

* 1 credit each year 9-12


Non-Credit Requirements
  • Retreat -- each year
  • Community Service
    -- each year (Community Service page)
  • College Advising
    (grades 11 & 12)
  • Formation Seminar (grade 9)

Graduation Requirements

 

25 ½ Credits Minimum
  • English -- 4 credits *
  • Math -- 4 credits *
  • Theology -- 4 credits *
  • Science -- 3 years 
    (Global Science, Biology, Chemistry)
  • Foreign Language -- 3 years (same language)
  • History -- 3 years
    (History I, II, III)
  • Fine & Performing Arts -- 1 credit total
  • Computer Technology -- ½ credit
  • Electives -- 3 credits

* 1 credit each year 9-12


Non-Credit Requirements
  • Retreat -- each year
  • Community Service
    -- each year (Community Service page)
  • College Advising
    (grades 11 & 12)
  • Formation Seminar (grade 9)

Academic Excellence in the Jesuit Tradition